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                                          Basic Obedience

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DOGS LIKE TO OBEY. IT GIVES THEM SECURITY. -JAMES HERRIOT

The Last Resort obedience training program strives to give professional guidance and instruction on three key elements needed to build a basic foundation for good obedience. Focus, Communication, and Dominance. Our program is based on the way dogs think as a species, and utilizes positive motivation techniques. It a versatile program and can be used for virtually any breed of dog regardless of size. We offer mobile dog training instruction planned around your schedule in the comfort of your home. We also have group basic obedience classes and private lessons offered year round. Please call if you are interested in learning more. 

Comprehensive Course In Canine Behavior
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What is the domestic dog

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Characteristics of the canine species

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Recognizing instinctive canine drives

The Following Commands
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Heel

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Sit

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Stay

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Down

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Come/Recalls

Proper Communication Techniques
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Training

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The importance of animation

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Proper disbursement of leash energy

Basic Obedience Commands

When your dog is about four to six months old, he will probably be ready for obedience training. If you have an older dog, it’s never too late to start. Dogs are smart; they can learn at any age.

Sit

To teach sit, put your dog or puppy on your left side. Walk along with your dog, stop, and give the command “Sit!” You don’t have to yell, just speak in a normal tone of voice. With your left hand, guide his rear down into a sitting position. Your right hand holds his head up and in position with the lead. When his rear end hits the floor and he’s looking up at you, say “Good sit!” Practice once or twice several times a day.

Stay
With your pup or dog on lead on your left side, tell him “Sit.” When he’s seated, say “Stay,” and place the palm of your left hand in front of his muzzle. Take one step away from him. Don’t try to make him stay for more than a few seconds at first. If he moves, guide him back into position and start over. When he will stay for just a few seconds, praise with “Good stay!” and call him to you happily. Slowly increase the time and distance you step away from him until he’ll stay for at least three minutes. With practice you’ll be able to go some distance before coming back.

Down
This one also starts off with your dog or puppy sitting on your left side. Stand over or kneel beside him and take his front paws in your hands. Say “Down” and gently move his paws out and down until he is in the down position. If you do this with your left arm over his back and around his body, he shouldn’t want to struggle against you. Keep him in position for a few seconds and then release him and get him into sit position for another try. Practice occasionally until he goes down on command without your having to move him. He should stay quietly until released, without any pressure of your hand on his back. After a few days, you should be able to stand and give only one command, “Down,” to have him lie at your side.

Come

This is probably the most important command your dog can learn. With your puppy or dog walking at your side, take a sudden step back and say your dog’s name followed by “Come!” As you call him, snap the lead to turn him around and get him headed back to you. Make it fun. When he’s facing you, keep walking backward, urging him along. The key to success with “Come” is that there is never a contest of brute strength between you and your dog. He should already be in motion when you first give him the “Come” command while walking, and you should be happily encouraging him to join you. Never call your dog to come when you’re angry, or he will associate coming to you with something negative.

Heel

To begin heeling, put the dog on your left side and start to walk by calling his name and giving the command to heel. Give the command just as you take the first step, and simultaneously give a light snap on the leash to persuade him to come along. Remember to step off with your left leg first; this tells your dog you’re ready to go. As you walk along, continue to urge him to walk at your left side, with his neck and shoulder aligned with your left leg. Praise when he gets it right: “Good heel!” It takes a while for a dog to learn this one. Practice in brief but lengthening sessions two or more times daily until you have to give only one command as you start walking.

Training Tips

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Keep training sessions short—about 10 minutes once or twice a day.

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Keep training positive and fun. Stop if you feel bored or frustrated, and try again later.

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Play with your dog after training.

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Use the dog’s name with movement exercises.

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If using a training collar, tighten with short, quick pulls only, not a long steady pull—that can hurt the dog.

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Give commands once, with kindness and firmness. Do not plead or yell.

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Praise after every completed command. This is what the dog is working for. You cannot praise too much.

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For the sit, run your hand along the dog’s back and behind his tail, and gently push behind the knee, where the back leg naturally bends. Don’t push down on your dog’s hips.

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The “come” command is the most important of all for your dog’s safety. However, if your dog hasn’t learned to come when called, don’t chase him or get mad at him. That will give him the wrong message. Keep him on a leash until he will come properly, and always praise when he comes.

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Stay hopeful. Training takes time. Believe in your ability to get the job done, and believe in your dog’s intelligence and ability to learn. Training takes patience, persistence, and confidence. In time, you and your well-trained dog will have a solid foundation for a friendship based on mutual, loving respect.

 

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